Posts Tagged 'history'

The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell – III

If an atrocity isn’t written about, it stops existing when the last witnesses die. That’s what I can’t stand. If a mass shooting, a bomb, a whatever, is written about, then at least it’s made a tiny dent in the world’s memory. Someone, somewhere, some time, has a chance of learning what happened. And, just maybe, acting on it. Or not. But at least it’s there.

Mitchell, David. The Bone Clocks: A Novel. New York: Random House, 2014.

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Orthodoxy by G K Chesterton – IV

This is the actual history of mankind. This, as a fact, is how cities did grow great. Go back to the darkest roots of civilization and you will find them knotted round some sacred stone or encircling some sacred well. People first paid honour to a spot and afterwards gained glory for it. Men did not love Rome because she was great. She was great because they had loved her.

History of the Ancient World by Susan Wise Bauer – III

No one calls himself a barbarian…that’s what your enemy calls you.
 
Bauer, S. Wise. “The First Barbarian Invasions.” The History of the Ancient World: From the Earliest Accounts to the Fall of Rome. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. 119. 

 

History of the Ancient World by Susan Wise Bauer – II

Intermarriage of blood relations tends to reproduce a limited genetic pool, so damage in the genes is more likely to show up. In Europe, thousands of years later, decades of royal matches between blood relatives produced a slew of illnesses and imbecilities. Ferdinand I of Austria, whose mother was also his double first cousin once removed, liked to pack himself into a wastepaper basket and roll down the hall, and his most coherent utterance was reportedly, “I am the emperor! I want dumplings!”
Bauer, S. Wise. “The First Collapse of Empire.” The History of the Ancient World: From the Earliest Accounts to the Fall of Rome. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. 114. 

 

History of the Ancient World by Susan Wise Bauer

No one was ever buried in the failed [Medium] Pyramid. Nor did the tiny, windowless temple at the end of the causeway really strike anyone as a spectacular achievement. A few centuries later, some Egyptian wandering past the drab little box scribbled on it “The Beautiful Temple of King Snefru,” the first example of sarcastic graffiti in history.
 
Bauer, S. Wise. “The First Victory over Death.” The History of the Ancient World: From the Earliest Accounts to the Fall of Rome. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. 82. Print.